Tag Archives: Novel

The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness

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Blurb

Prentisstown isn’t like other towns. Everyone can hear everyone else’s thoughts in an overwhelming, never-ending stream of Noise. Just a month away from the birthday that will make him a man, Todd and his dog, Manchee — whose thoughts Todd can hear too, whether he wants to or not — stumble upon an area of complete silence. They find that in a town where privacy is impossible, something terrible has been hidden — a secret so awful that Todd and Manchee must run for their lives.

But how do you escape when your pursuers can hear your every thought?

My Review:

I was intrigued with the idea of Noise in both men and animals – the ability or disability – to be able to hear what creatures are thinking. This plays a huge part in the development of the plot of “The Knife of Never Letting Go” by Patrick Ness.

The world that has been home to Todd Hewitt is a strange one. Not only is Noise prevalent, but there are no women in the town where Todd grew up. His thirteenth birthday is approaching – the date when he will become a man – when Todd encounters a girl in the nearby swamp. He is totally amazed by this being and also, by her silence. However, this unexpected meeting has enormous consequences for Todd and he is forced to flee from all he knows.

The story centres around Todd and Viola’s attempts to reach the town of Haven, where they are assured they will be safe and learn the answers to their many questions.

I was drawn in by the plot lines, but found that I didn’t like Todd very much; maybe I will warm to him in the next two books in the trilogy. I also found the constant running rather monotonous! However, despite these feelings, I’ve moved on to the next book, “The Ask and the Answer” straight away!

About the Author:370361

Patrick Ness, an award-winning novelist, has written for England’s Radio 4 and Sunday Telegraph and is a literary critic for The Guardian. He has written many books, including the Chaos Walking Trilogy, The Crash of Hennington, Topics About Which I Know Nothing, and A Monster Calls.

He has won numerous awards, including the Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize, the Booktrust Teenage Prize, and the Costa Children’s Book Award. Born in Virginia, he currently lives in London.

The Other Hoffmann Sister by Ben Fergusson

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The Hoffmann sisters, Ingrid and her older sibling, Margarete, are taken to German Southwest Africa in 1902, to live on land bought by their father from Baron von Ketz. The Baron, his wife and son, Emil live nearby and “give” their servants Nora and Hans to the Hoffmanns, to help them settle and to make their life more comfortable. It soon becomes clear that Margarete is not emotionally stable and that the hot, arid country does not suit her particularly well.

In some ways, Ingrid settles better. She has her books to read and is given language lessons by Hans. He is well educated and speaks German and French. Time is taken away from these lessons when he has to escort Margarete over to the von Ketz home every week. It is not totally clear to Ingrid why these trips are occurring.

The Hoffmanns eventually leave Africa in a hurried manner, after Baron von Ketz is murdered at the start of a Herero uprising. Hans and Nora are missing, and this is a source of anguish for Ingrid. This younger Hoffmann sister is full of questions about what has happened and what is to come. She loves her sister deeply and cares for her well-being and these feeling for her sister continue on their return to Germany. When Margarete becomes engaged to the young Baron von Ketz, Ingrid has some misgivings. On the wedding night, Margarete disappears and it is presumed that she is dead – drowned in the lake. The rest of the novel is about Ingrid’s search for knowledge of her sister’s disappearance and her reawakened desire to discover what happened to Hans.

A considerable amount of the story takes place in Berlin after the First World War, where Ingrid becomes tentatively involved with the revolution in the city. At times, her searches for the missing are set aside so that she can follow her passion for translating poetry from English and French into German. However, on return to the von Ketz country estate, the anguish of her loss re-emerges, along with her determination to discover the truth.

This was not a particularly easy novel to read, as the pace is variable. At times, the plot seems to come to a standstill, but then, with a new piece of information, or change of scene, it moves along again. Thinking about this, however, I feel now that this is a mirror of Ingrid’s feelings and actions. She was surrounded by unanswered questions and deception; at times, the confusion seemed to overwhelm her and she, herself, came to a standstill. Then, something was revealed to her and she could move on with her quests.

I am glad that I read this book. It gave much food for thought and I was interested in the sections on post war Berlin and the revolution. Much is written about the post war world, but I hadn’t read anything that looked at it through German eyes.

Thank you to NetGalley for allowing me to read “The Other Hoffmann Sister” in return for my honest review.

Meet the Author:8153785

Ben Fergusson is an award-winning novelist. He was born in Southampton in 1980 and grew up near Didcot in Oxfordshire. He studied English Literature at Warwick University and Modern Languages at Bristol University. Since leaving university he has worked as an editor, translator and publisher in London and Berlin and currently teaches at the University of Potsdam.

​Ben’s debut novel, The Spring of Kasper Meier, was selected for the Waterstone’s Book Club, WHSmith Fresh Talent and the BBC Radio 2 Book Club. It was longlisted for the Authors’ Club Best First Novel Award and shortlisted for The Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award. It won the 2015 Betty Trask Prize for an outstanding debut novel by a writer under 35 and the HWA Debut Crown 2015 for the best historical fiction debut of the year. His second novel, The Other Hoffmann Sister, will be published by Little, Brown in 2017.

The Wild Air by Rebecca Mascull – Blog Tour!

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I am delighted to feature Rebecca Mascull’s excellent novel, “The Wild Air” here today , as part of the blog tour.

My review:

Rebecca Mascull’s novel “The Wild Air” is set in the early years of the 20th century, a time of change in more ways than one. The major event of the time was the First World War, which saw enormous loss of life and changed people’s view of warfare forever. The years before the war were a time of daring and inventive changes in the history of flight, which was to impact on the coming years of war.

It is against this backdrop that we meet the characters of this interesting and captivating novel. The main protagonist is a young girl from Cleethorpes. Della Dobbs is the third daughter in her family; she is a plain, quiet girl, who is a disappointment to her embittered father. Mr Dobbs had been an actor, but an accident prevented him from continuing in this profession; undoubtedly, his attitude towards life changed. His two older daughters were leading successful lives and his only son – and the youngest in the family – was his pride and joy. Poor Della was just a disappointment!

Della’s life was rather dull, except when she was cycling as fast as she could around the town. The arrival of Aunt Betty, who had lived for much of her life in the American town of Kitty Hawk, opened Della’s eyes to the possibility of living a different life. Aunt Betty and Della found great satisfaction in discussing flight and developing and flying kites on the beach at Cleethorpes and it is here that Dudley Willow enters Della’s life. Although he is five years younger than her, they have a shared interest in aviation. It is through magazines that he sends her that Della learns about aviatrix – women who fly!

We follow Della’s life through the following years – her exciting career as an aviatrix, unfortunately interrupted by the war. We have horrifying glimpses into trench warfare, and we see the damage that this does to soldiers’ minds and bodies. We follow the changing relationships within Della’s family and also the development of her own relationship with Dudley Willow.

I enjoyed this novel very much. The characters were well-rounded and believable. I like to read books with strong female characters; it was especially refreshing to have a character, like Della, who was considered to be too quiet, a nonentity, who discovered her passion and followed it. I found that I really cared about the characters and how their lives unfolded.

“The Wild Air” is well written and meticulously researched. I was interested to read that the author used much of the expertise to be found at the Shuttleworth Collection. My family and I have visited the Collection many times in the past forty years and have seen many of the vintage planes mentioned in the novel. This certainly increased my involvement with Della’s flying exploits, which had a feeling of real authenticity.

I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys historical novels set in the more recent past. As well as good story, with romance, excitement and all the dynamics of family life, this is an informative work – one which could be the starting point for further factual study into early flight, the First World War and its devastating effects. I love novels that provide these sorts of “jumping off” points and will certainly be looking for more Rebecca Mascull novels.

I would like to thank NetGalley for enabling me to read and review “The Wild Air” and Hodder and Stoughton for enabling me to take part in the blog tour.

About the Author:

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Rebecca Mascull lives by the sea in the east of England with her partner Simon and their daughter Poppy. She has previously worked in education and has a Masters in Writing. Her previous novels are “The Visitors” and “Song of the Sea Maid”.

Find out more about her books by following this link:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_book_1?ie=UTF8&text=Rebecca+Mascull&search-alias=books-uk&field-author=Rebecca+Mascull&sort=relevancerank%5Bgallery ids=”1474,1475″ t<img

Malignant Memory by Barbara L. Paterson

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“Malignant Memory” by  Barbara L.Paterson is a novel that is based on true events, many of which the author learned about in the course of her career. As such, I found this to be an interesting insight into the lives of young people who were unfortunate to be brought up in orphanages or who had to attend residential schools because of their ethnicity in the first part of the 20th century. Many of the stories told by characters in the novel were horrifying to say the least.

 

The novel is told through the eyes of Elizabeth, who is a “secret keeper”. Over her lifetime, she has been told many secrets, which she has kept, but there was one that had caused her anguish. This is the malignant memory which she hopes to expunge by telling it to us, her readers.

 

In order for us to understand this secret and why it has had such an effect on her, she feels the need to tell us of her life. Her early days were spent on a farm with her parents and brothers, but she was sent to live with her little known grandmother, Andy. This was to enable her to have a good education. Life was not easy for Elizabeth. Her grandmother, who was highly thought of in          the town, was subject to uncontrollable rages – “the furies”- in which she would physically and verbally abuse her granddaughter. Eventually, with the help of some of the people who lived nearby and knew of Andy’s history growing up in an orphanage, Elizabeth and Andy worked at overcoming the traumatic experiences that they had and were suffering.

 

Towards the end of the book, after meeting several others who played significant roles in Elizabeth’s life, we are told what the malignant memory is and what she has learned about herself and others by disclosing the memory to her readers.

 

Although written in the form of a fictional memoir, with little dialogue, I did not become bored. As well as revealing some of the abuse suffered by the vulnerable, it also provided food for thought about grief, acceptance and being judgemental. All in all, an interesting novel that I am glad I have read.

I would like to thank NetGalley for the opportunity to read and   review “Malignant Memory”.

About the author:

Dr. Barbara Paterson was an adult before she discovered that her dearly beloved grandmother had grown up in an orphanage. This information helped her to make sense of the uncontrollable rages that her grandmother often experienced. Later, in her work as a nurse with residential school survivors and people who experience devastating illnesses, she recognized that the ravages of extreme grief are often revealed in behaviors that are harmful to the suffering person and to those around him or her.

Dr. Paterson has an interdisciplinary doctorate in nursing, psychology and education, as well as a master’s degree in post-secondary education. She served as a professor at the University of Manitoba, the University of British Columbia, the University of New Brunswick, and Thompson River University until her retirement in 2013.

Dr. Paterson is the recipient of several prestigious awards, such as the 3M Teaching Excellence Award, the Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Medal and Canada’s Most Powerful Women Award for her work as a university educator and her research on chronic illness. Dr. Paterson speaks frequently on topics of education, health and Canada’s aboriginal people, and has been featured on top media outlets like CBC Radio and in more than one hundred scholarly journals. She lives outside Winnipeg, Manitoba.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Malignant-Memory-Barbara-L-Paterson-x/dp/0995332703/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1490895354&sr=1-1&keywords

Let the Dead Speak by Jane Casey

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My review:

 

Although “Let the Dead Speak” is the seventh in a series of crime novels featuring Police Officer Maeve Kerrigan, this is the first that I have read……..and it certainly will not be the last!

Jane Casey’s superb crime novel is so full of intrigue and suspense, that it is difficult to describe the plot in great detail without spoiling the book for others. What appears at first to be a classic case of a bloody and vicious murder turns into much more. Child abuse, fraud, blackmail – all appear as the plot unfolds.

The maze of intrigue and investigation begins when young Chloe Emery returns home unexpectedly, to find her mother is missing and her home looking like an abattoir. The murder squad team, which includes newly promoted D.S. Maeve Kerrigan and D.I. Derwent, are called in and the investigation begins. What appears at first to be a fairly straightforward case becomes anything but when Kate Emery’s body cannot be found and neighbours act suspiciously when questioned.

With each new piece of evidence, with each apparent dead end, the suspense and intrigue grows, making this an unputdownable crime novel. As I said earlier, I have not read the previous six books in this series, but it worked well as a standalone. It has piqued my interest and curiosity to find out more about Kerrigan and Derwent and other cases they have been involved in.

I enjoyed Jane Casey’s writing style. Without being too wordy, she portrays characters and scenes in such a way as to make them live in my imagination.  The characters all have depth and are “real”, to the extent that I cared about what happened to them – or I detested them! I am particularly interested in the past relationship of Kerrigan and Derwent and look forward to back-tracking.

I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good crime novel     and would like to thank NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review it.

Find out more about Jane Casey and her work on her Amazon page:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Jane-Casey/e/B003VNABHU/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1490280613&sr=1-2-ent

In the Eyes of an Angel by Kimberly Livingston -review and author interview.

Today, it is my pleasure to welcome author, Kimberly Livingston to my blog.

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Blurb:

Camille Ryan is in her final year at Southern State University. Working as a bartender in a local establishment in order to support herself, she knows from her mother’s experience with her alcoholic father not to depend on anyone. That is until travelling businessman Rick Pantanelli decides to visit her bar. He is a handsome, well-off, successful professional and her senior by a full 17 years.

Camille is used to doing everything she is expected to do. But when she meets Rick she is swept away by his good looks, his charm and his ability to take care of her. Rick is used to getting what he wants. But when he meets Camille he is swept away by her beauty and her inner fragility. He finds himself believing he can take care of her. Is this belief strong enough to make him a better man?

My Review:

“In the Eyes of an Angel” by Kimberly Livingston traces the story of Camille Ryan’s life during her last few months at university and her first steps into the world of work.

Our first meeting with Camille finds her working as a barmaid, in an attempt to help pay her bills as she completes her studies. Quickly, we gain the impression of a gentle, decent young woman, but one who has little sense of her own worth. Her family life has been lacking in security – her father is an alcoholic; her mother, a woman who appears to find it hard to show emotion.

Camille is a beautiful young woman and attracts the attention of business man, Rick Pantanelli. The attraction is mutual and a relationship develops between them. However, is this a match made in heaven? Time and circumstances will tell. To say more about the plot would spoil the story for other readers, so I shall leave it there!

What I really enjoyed about this novel was the way in which Camille’s self-confidence grew, alongside her belief that she was worth knowing and had a purpose in life. She had always worked hard, but had lacked the support and time to nurture her sense of self. This was a rocky road for her to travel, and it held my interest throughout. I was also interested in Rick’s character – a successful man, but not very likeable, in my opinion.

I have to admit that I don’t read many romance novels, but I did enjoy this one and look forward to reading the promised follow-up.

 
 Interview with Kimberly Livingston:
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 Hello Kimberly. I’m delighted to welcome you to my blog today. Would you like to tell us a little about yourself?

Thank you for having me.  What an honor! I am from Colorado, which, for your UK readers, is in the western half of the United States near the Rocky Mountains. I am a Disney FANATIC (my homage to Disneyland is in my novel On a Run) and am so excited to be spending my 50th birthday there in a few weeks!!! I was raised on Happily Ever After stories, even though I realize, those don’t always turn out like the main hero/heroine expected. I am married to my own Prince Charming (I got lucky!) who is a golf fanatic so we spend a lot of time outdoors, and hopefully will make it to the UK to do some golfing before too long!

It would be great if you could come over to the UK!

 Q. Have you always been an author?

A. That’s an interesting question. I’d say….. Yes. I have made up stories and written them down for as long as I can remember. I remember starting my first “novel” back in elementary school. I actually might still have a copy! That novel got to be about a page and a half long, but the concept was there. Who knows, I might finish that novel someday.

Q. Do you have a set routine when you are writing?  

A. I wish! I am an author who still has a day job so my writing time tends to be catch as catch can. I can edit with any distraction going on, but to write I need to have my own head space. Doesn’t matter when, day or night, but once I get started I can write for hours on end. I have been known to write while sitting lake side while my husband fishes, sitting with my laptop in bed all day, or stopping mid walk or run to voice-write a scene I’d been mulling over into my phone.

Q. Are there any authors that have influenced you? What have you admired about their work?

A. I’d say all authors influence me, but the author that I am most similar to style wise is probably Susan Wiggs. I am especially awed by authors who can come up with complex worlds or situations so different from our own. Erin Morgenstern’s Night Circus is one example. I wish I were that creative and skilled! I also have loved Barbara Kingsolver’s work. Both of those authors paint such vivid characters and settings. However, as I often read my own genre that gives me comfort to know that a good novel doesn’t have to be long or complex. It just needs to be a good story with relatable characters (and hopefully a happy ending!).

 I loved “The Night Circus” but have yet to read any of Barbara Kingsolver’s novels. I’ll have to remedy that!

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Q.I enjoyed reading “In the Eyes of an Angel.” How long did it take you to write it? Did you follow a plan or did the plot and characters evolve as you were writing?

A.Phew! I am so happy you enjoyed it. That is the hardest part about publishing. When I write I can love my work, but the moment I put it “out there” it becomes very vulnerable. I wrote In the Eyes of an Angel over about a 6 month period. I was on a leave of absence at the time, so I was able to work on it fairly consistently. I rarely have a “plan” when I write. Okay, I never have a plan.  Typically I have a character or a situation in mind and then my imagination just takes over and the novel writes itself. Sometimes I don’t even have the character or situation in mind to start, I just start daydreaming and the stories emerge.

 

Q. The characters in the book were very “real”. Were they based on anyone you know or figments of your imagination?

A.What a great compliment! My characters are figments of my imagination, though I may see a person or have a memory that sparks a story in my head. One observation may begin the whole story telling process. For In the Eyes of an Angel I used the memory of a bar I worked at when I was in college as the backdrop, but there was no Camille or Rick, they just developed themselves. Often when I am writing I “become” the character, which helps I think in capturing the inner person. The characters become very real to me, so it is nice that that translates to my readers.

 
Q.Can you tell us a little about what you are hoping to have published in the future?

A.I just finished the follow up novel to In the Eyes of an Angel. I felt like one of the characters was truly misunderstood in that book so I wanted to tell the rest of their story. Hence, the title of my new novel is “Book by Another Cover”. I am extremely happy with how it all works out (remember, I never know how a book will resolve itself)! I am currently working on the editing process and developing a cover for it, then it will be up on Amazon Kindle for purchase!

 

Thank you so much for being a guest on my blog. It’s been a pleasure to chat to you and learn a little more about you and your work.

Thank you again for having me on your blog! If you or any of your readers have any follow up questions or would just like to connect they can find me at
kimberlylivingstonnovels. weebly.com
twitter.com/KLnovels
facebook.com/ kimberlylivingstonnovels

 

 

The Riviera Express by T.P. Fielden

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“The Riviera Express” by T.P.Fielden is the first in a series of Riviera Murder Mysteries, featuring Miss Judy Dimont.

Described by some reviewers as a “cosy” mystery novel, this has much more to offer than some books in this sub-genre. It is true that this murder mystery does not contain the blood and violence of many grittier novels, hence the “cosy” label, but “The Riviera Express” is full of intrigue.

When the train, known as the Riviera Express, arrives in Temple Regis, a beautiful seaside town in Devon, it is met by local journalist, Judy Dimont and news photographer, Terry Eagleton.  They are there to meet the famous actor, Gerald Hennessy, who is due to arrive that afternoon. Against all expectations, there is to be no exclusive interview, as Mr Hennessy is found to be dead on arrival! Another death follows fast on the heels of this – that of Arthur Shrimsley, who is found dead at the bottom of the cliffs. It appears that these two deaths are not suspicious, but Judy Dimont soon comes to other conclusions after interviewing several people connected to the two deceased men. It also appears that there was a connection between the two men, which may cast doubt on the coroner’s verdicts of death from natural causes and accidental death.

As well as an intriguing plot, “The Riviera Express” also has some well- drawn characters, particularly the feisty main character, journalist Miss Judy Dimont. This is a woman with a past. We don’t know a great deal about her role in the War, but the many hints are enough for us to know that it was important and secret. Apparently, it was during the War that she gained experience of looking for clues in people’s actions and words, all of which enhanced her post-war role as a journalist for a provincial newspaper, The Riviera Express. This is certainly no cardboard cut-out character and I look forward to reading more of her exploits.

Another aspect of this novel that I enjoyed was the style in which it is written. Set in the late 1950s, the author has written in a way which evokes the era. The novel is rich in vocabulary not in common use – Miss Dimont thinks of the actor-manager of the local theatre as “the old poodlefaker”; the view from a hotel window is described :”….the sea beyond and the still effulgent clouds suspended above, allowed eventide to enter the room and bestow upon its furniture a special glow.” Later, travelling journalists are described as “crumpled journeyman scriveners”.  These little gems, plus touches of humour, enhanced the reading of the book.

All in all, “The Riviera Express” was a thoroughly enjoyable read for me; I hadn’t expected to like it as much as I did, if I’m honest.

Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with the opportunity to read and review this book.

Published by Harlequin U.K.

Available from Amazon.co.uk:

Hardcover: The Riviera Express: £12.08

Kindle : The Riviera Express: £7.99

Audio: The Riviera Express: £11.37 or £7.99 with Audible Membership.

Also available from Amazon.com:

Hardcover:The Riviera Express: $9.76